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03/08/2008

Namibian Scarecrows, Dead Vlei, Namibia


This photo was taken in Namibia. Sossusvlei is a salt pan in the central Namib Desert, lying within the Namib-Naukluft National Park. Fed by the Tsauchab River, it is known for the high, red sand dunes which surround it, forming a major and impressive sand sea. More precisely this photo shows Dead Vlei, a clay pan surrounded by the highest sand dunes in the world, some reaching up to 300m, which rest on a sandstone terrace. The clay pan was formed after rains when the river flooded creating temporary shallow pools where the abundance of water allowed camel thorn trees to grow. When climate changed, drought hit the area and sand dunes encroached on the pan, which blocked the river from the area. Because the water supply was stopped the trees died, however there are some species of plants remaining, such as Salsola and clumps of Nara. The remaining “skeletons” of the trees, which are believed to be about 900 years old, are now black because the intense sun has scorched them.
The second photo is from a previous post.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Wow, I had missed the previous post. The two shots are fantastic, superb colors. Golden minutes ?

Anonymous said...

Really stunning place and photos...

Loïc BROHARD said...

Not really golden minutes for this shot. However photo was taken in the middle of the morning. Anyway, the place is so stunning and the colors and light so magic... Thanks for your comments.

Riri said...

Wow !
What an incredible place...
looks like a dream set

The Eye said...

Loïc:

Thanks for the comment you left on Shutter-Eye. After seeing some of your work, your compliments carry a lot of weight. The surreal starkness of this scene really captivated my gaze.

The Internet has become a place of virtual travel where one can view snippets of others' experiences. In this way, all our travels can enrich us all.

-i